Blog Navigation

I am still learning the finer points of putting together a blog; BUT IF YOU ARE LOOKING FOR A MINI GYPSY HORSE FOR SALE you have come to the right place.  Here at Bellbottom Farm, I’m always hoping to make things easier for people to find information, but  I have simply stumbled in and practise learning by doing, so you must be patient with me if things are confusing at times.  For instance, I am still sorting out “pages” from regular “posts”!  And photo’s are always a challenge.  Please note that photos if they are small size and individual on the page can be “clicked on” and it will bring up a bigger photo to study!

The menu links are mostly in the header, for example, but there are some posts that are only accessible thru clicking on the “categories” menu at right and choosing a topic.

I’m not quite sure why but it seems like the MARES will have to be accessed by listing the posts according to the “categories” choice to the right…use the drop down menu and choose the topic and it will bring up a page with a list of blog titles and you can click on the title to read the whole entry.  In 2014 I will continue to try to update the mare information as foaling season gets close.  A bit of the complication is not having good photos.  I need to round up photo help soon.  Thank you for your patience.

I am proud of the good start I have of blog entries under the HISTORY category, so use the drop down menu to easily access these.  For instance, there are three stories about HORSE BRASS decorations, which is a bit hard to find information about.

The calendar at right has highlighted days you can click on to see what the topics of the day were.  Just below the calendar is the link arrow button to move the display month to the next one.  I have decided to make individual links for the stallions/prospects, and the mares will mostly be displayed through their youngstock; eventually hope to get more organized and easier to follow.

Today I would like to offer a look at some of the variations of grey color in good breeding stock in UK and Ireland.  Karl Maher of Dublin Ireland has a young horse very pretty coming on as a two year old with heavy feather and a big mustache already…he is I believe what is called a non fading grey, or “blue” blagdon which I think will prove to be a colour shade related to the sabino white gene but it is not genetically verified yet…but certainly makes a beautiful pony!  I have added an “appaloosa” or as they call them in the old country “spotties” and another amazing heavy feathered classic piebald (black and white pinto/tobiano pattern). Also in the following grouping is a few from Kilflynn Cobs of Tralee, Ireland:

So I am simply sharing some pictures from overseas on here to give people something to look at besides my stock here in USA.  The above Irish ponies are probably not very closely related to mine, but I do admire their quality and look forward to seeing more Irish stock.  I am always happy to try to connect people for instance inquiries on horses for sale.

A great place to start looking for what is available in UK and Ireland is thru the Coates family:  http://www.gypsyhorses.co.uk/

Coates have a widely established wonderful reputation and they have given me permission to show a little series of photos here that they took of a pony a few years ago, a picture story about how a good horseman goes out to look for a new pony to buy:

Thank you for visiting and I hope that you are intrigued by the idea of this new breed of horse that is developing:  The American Mini Gypsy.   The gypsy cob breeders in UK/Ireland have also been working on this effort and already have some amazing little horses coming from their native stock.  I am excited about the future of the miniature gypsy horse here in the USA!  I welcome others to join in to this endeavor; together we will see a very amazing little horse in just a few years.  In my foal crop from 2013 I have continued to be amazed at the excellent qualities I am getting coming together within only a few years since I first bought the little grade welsh Gyp mare from Pennsylvania, in foal to Toymakker; she gifted me with “QT” in 2006.  But this year in 2013 I have seen my first 3/4 colt born out of a mare sired by Cold Fusion X mini mare, and this colt is sired by The Executive; he is a GORGEOUS little colt who will stay around ten hands…he will be very exciting to watch mature and looks like he will have substantial feather.    My program is quickly evolving because I believe in the strength of outcrossing and not using just one stallion to build a herd. I believe in having superior quality mares and using the best stallion on them that I can find.  I feel that I am being rewarded quite well so far.    Please enjoy reading my blog….

24 Responses to Blog Navigation

  1. Steffanie Rodgers says:

    This is a phenomenal idea, fantastic page! 8 years ago I got started in miniature horses and thought, how cool would it be to breed them selectively for heavy feather and hair to look like mini gypsy horses? Last year my dream came true of buying a solid black gypsy vanner colt. It didn’t dawn on me until now that I have the tools and resources needed to actually persue breeding for actual miniature gypsy horses! I am excited beyond belief to get my program started and will invest my time and dedicate my program to helping create the Miniature Gypsy Horse Association!

  2. Mick says:

    Melanie, I hope we can get somthing started here in the US like what exists in the UK and Ireland. I hope Wyatt can contribute to that end.

    • minigypsy1 says:

      Thank you, Mick, for your support and enthusiasm! I hope that you stay involved in further development and I’m sure with a small group of us here getting things rolling, that some astoundingly beautiful miniature gypsy horses will develop!

  3. Mick says:

    Melanine, Well you are ahead of most of us in the goal for creating a mini Gypsy here in the US. These guys are pretty popular in the UK, and seems the smaller the more demand. I am going to try to find a nice breeding package, if its too expensive, well, you’ll have that, but I want to see what the quality ones cost. Its also in UK’s interest too to ship a few nice ones over here, as this will also boost their market or at leat sustain it longer, There are times when I wish I was Bill Gates.

  4. Karen Kerry says:

    I,m thrilled that there is an upcoming market in the US for the mini gypsies! Personally I would love to see these little cobs under saddle in the showring ridden by children! Something like the mountain and moorland classes they have in the UK.The US is so far up on us for showing Cobs generally that it is the place for them especially geldings. As a mother I would also far rather my child on a cob then a blood pony!

    • minigypsy1 says:

      Thanks so much, Karen! I have only heard about a couple mountain/moorland classes here in US and I agree, would be great to have more lovely heavy ponies around for children to show and ride.

  5. Elise Miller says:

    I love the idea of a Gypsy Pony in the US. I currently breed Fell Ponies that average 13.2 hh. My daughter is wanting a little smaller pony that is black and white, yet something that still has bone and feather like the Fell Pony. Since the Fell Pony is in the foundation of the Gypsy, it would be nice to have a bit of a variation!! More future Mountain and Moorland classes in the US would be so wonderful as well!! Having nice small and stout ponies for children to show and ride with sensible brains and temperaments will be very much appreciated by many, I am sure!!

  6. I have always wanted a small draft type pony breed to come about but it was not until recently that I met Melanie and her little horses. I am excited that she and a few others are working towards their goals and producing some wonderful gypsy ponies. One day I hope that I can own at least one of these little hairy treasures and perhaps if I am lucky enough I will be able to participate in its development.

  7. kim jackman says:

    I have a miniature cob, 2yrs old and still only 38″ and also very excited about starting a miniature cob type that would be ideal for driving and ridden for children. Ive never seen a miniature so typey for the cob as the filly I have although I have been breeding miniatures for many years. Anyone else got a cob this small??

    • minigypsy1 says:

      Very exciting to hear of your filly! It is so hard to find the females with the heavy bone and body type; I have run across several males (usually gelded) over the years that have fit an idea of cob type pony, but hardly ever females. Hope you become involved in our endeavor and find connections in the mini gypsy horse endeavor. For the last several months I have stayed busy mostly on facebook since everyone is so widespread that seems to be the easiest way for now to connect. Have you found the Mini Gypsy Horse and Miniature Gypsy Cob groups there? Where are you located?

  8. Your mode of describing all in this article is really pleasant, all be capable
    of simply be aware of it, Thanks a lot.

  9. Viki says:

    I am so excited about the “micro Cob”, I bought a 4 month old colt from a gypsy trader for £450 because I felt so sorry for him, they had sold his mother and the poor little thing was skin and bones and covered in ringworm..he had attached him self to a miniature Shetland mare who had recently her foal taken from her..so I bought them both .,..that was 6 years ago I nuerchered him and her , he has turned out to be a lovely little cob measuring 13 hh, I was wondering if this qualifies to be called a “Microcob” being just 13 hh.

    • minigypsy1 says:

      Aw, bless you! These 13 hand stock still have an opportunity to contribute to the future but you will have to figure out your own way as far as how that happens I’m thinking. You are welcome to join in with discussion on a couple of different groups on facebook, Mini Gypsy Horse and Miniature Gypsy Cob….the latter being more designed for discussion between people wanting to breed crosses to build the little genetics into the feathered cob.

  10. Viki says:

    Hi, thanks for your quick reply, are they both the same thing mini Gypsy horse and miniature gypsy Cob ??

  11. Yes, these horses are rather like the people who developed them, they can be called many names! Tinker is most associated with Irish horses in the past. Gypsy Cob is the preferred name in UK. Coloured cob pony is used throughout. When USA found them they called them gypsy vanners but they all derive from the same bloodstock intermingled. Horses and ponies are traded every year between Ireland and UK and have been for decades/centuries!

  12. I have 2 small cobs for sale in Ireland they are 2 years old black and gelded and very well handled.

  13. Jennifer says:

    How tall are your vanners at 4 months old?

    • minigypsy1 says:

      My tallest purebred is 13.2 hands, and my smallest purebred gypsy so far is 12 hands. I don’t keep track in general how tall they might be at weaning age of 4 months…all I can say is right now I have for sale a bay filly who is “pure cob” being 3/4 gypsy from imports, and the other 1/4 is welsh cob pony from import lines. So, this filly is still only about 9 hands tall at 5 months old so I don’t think she will make 12 hands. She is for sale $2000 in case you are interested. Thanks for inquiry.

  14. sean smith says:

    We are waiting for 12 gypsy pony foal from our stallion who is grandson of the lion king. Search youtube for smiths gypsy cob stallion to see him. Cant wait

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